Jiangsu, China
Business Type:
Manufacturer/Factory, Trading Company
Business Range:
Agriculture & Food, Chemicals, Health & Medicine
Registered Capital:
1000000 RMB
Plant Area:
501~1000 square meters
Average Lead Time:
Peak season lead time: one month
Off season lead time: within 15 workday
OEM/ODM Service
Sample Available

Levodopa, Herb Extracts, Treat Parkinson′s Disease manufacturer / supplier in China, offering Levodopa, L-Dopa with High Quality on Sell, CAS No.: 518-17-2 Natural Evodiamine with The Purity 98%, Natural Kaempferol 98% CAS No: 520-18-3 and so on.

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Supplier Homepage Products Sap & Extract Levodopa, L-Dopa with High Quality on Sell

Levodopa, L-Dopa with High Quality on Sell

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Min. Order / Reference FOB Price
1 kg US $100/ Piece
Production Capacity: 25t Per Month
Transport Package: 25kg/Drum or at Your Requirements
Payment Terms: T/T, Paypal
Odor: Characteristic
Delivery: in Time
Specification: ISO
Trademark: Gorunjie
Origin: China

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Basic Info

Model NO.: GRJ20150327

Product Description

Assay: 98% 99% Levodopa
Molecular Formula: C9H11NO4
Molecular Weight: 197.19
CAS #: 59-92-7

The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.


The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

The gold standard of present therapy is the drug levodopa (also called L-dopa). L-Dopa (from the full name L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is a neutral amino acid found naturally in plants and animals. After oral ingestion, it is absorbed in the small intestine. Absorption can be delayed by meals and increased gastric acidity. Absorbed levodopa is not bound to plasma protein. Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply. Dopamine cannot be given directly because it doesn't cross the blood-brain barrier, the elaborate meshwork of fine blood vessels and cells that filters blood reaching the brain. Levodopa crosses the blood-brain barrier by way of the large neutral amino acid carrier transport system.

Levodopa is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. Levodopa is also used to treat these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

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